SFYN Podcast
On My Plate Challenge: Good Food.

On My Plate Challenge: Good Food.

January 18, 2021
This is the first episode dedicated to the On My Plate Challenge of Slow Food: what is good food? We will explore its meanings with three interviewees, from South Africa, Azerbaijan and Colombia. 
 
The three special guests of today are:
- Arnold Tanzer: he is the head of the Slow Food Cooks' Alliance in South Africa. The Slow Food cooks’s alliance is a network of cooks defending food biodiversity across the world. Arnold is based in Johannesburg. During the pandemic he has started a project called “Chefs with compassion”, with the goal of fighting food waste and supporting people in need;
 
- Yagub Zeynalzade: he is the spokesperson for the community Youth Network Food for Change Baku in Azerbaijan. The young activists together are raising awareness about healthy nutrition, preserving local food and biodiversity. Yagub is a chef as a profession. He studied at the Culinary Institute in Croatia and at ALMA in Italy;
 
- Cilia Inés Acosta Ocampo: she is part of the Slow Food community Wambid: mingueros del alimento. She is now retired but previously she was working for SENA, the national training service in Colombia. She carried out an amazing investigation related to culinary traditions along the Pacific coast of Colombia and she also participated in writing the book “El Festin”. This book is a collection of recipes of women from black communities in the Pacific.
 
Podcast host: Valentina Gritti
Production, editing & music: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes
Colombian music: Grupo Yuka
Dubbing: Maria Elena Vaccari.
 
This episode is realized in the occasion of the Slow Food event Terra Madre 2020: find the whole program on www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com 
 
Did you like this episode? Support our work and have access to extra material by becoming one of our patrons on http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/
 
Have you signed up for the On My Plate Challenge yet? If not, you can do it at Onmyplate.slowfood.com 
 
A project by the Slow Food Youth Network.
Terra Madre ecosystems: arid lands & regenerative preservation practices

Terra Madre ecosystems: arid lands & regenerative preservation practices

January 5, 2021

In this episode we want to take you to the arid lands, in particular we will talk about some regenerative preservation practices carried out by our super cool guests in different parts of the world. From New Mexico to Egypt, from Australia to Colorado and Spain… We will find out a lot about soil and food preservation practices. Yes, we will talk about permaculture and… about fermentation! Bacteria in the soil and in food. Also this time we have a very special host who has carried out all the interviews and worked on the whole concept: I am talking about Sara El Sayed. Sara is a Ph.D. candidate in food system sustainability, focusing on regenerative food practices in arid regions, she is also a researcher in Biomimicry. She is co-founder of Nawaya and co-founder of Dayma. She is currently a board member for Slow Food Phoenix. 

Guests:

- Roxanne Swentzl, a Pueblo woman from Santa Clara, New Mexico who co-founded the Flowering Tree Permaculture Institute;
- Menar Meebed is a grandmother and owner of Minnies Dried Fruit and Vegetables, in Cairo, Egypt;
- Salah Hammad, a permaculture consultant, and educator who lives in Sydney, Australia - originally from Jordan;
- Mara King is a fermentation chef and one of the co-founders of Ozuke. Originally from Hong Kong, she currently works at Fresh Times Eatery in Boulder, Colorado;
- Elena Escaño is a young agroecological pig farmer in Andalucia, Spain. At her family’s farm, Finca Montefrio, they breed the local pig race Iberico.

Project manager & host: Valentina Gritti.
Special host, first cutting & editing: Sara El Sayed.
Supported by: Anna Elovitz, Jordan Sene, Katherine Blessington and Madison Harris.
Composition, production & editing:
Leonardo Prieto Dorantes.
Musicians: 
Percussions: Philip Kukulies;
Flamenco minor at Codarts; Makaam minor at Codarts; Ngoni: Agustín Fernandez.

This episode is realized in the occasion of the Slow Food event Terra Madre 2020: find the whole program on www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com 
 
Did you like this episode? Support our work and have access to extra material by becoming one of our patrons on http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/
 

Financed by the European Union.
The contents of this podcast are the sole responsibility of the author and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network

Focus EU: what are we doing for biodiversity?

Focus EU: what are we doing for biodiversity?

December 31, 2020

What is the European Union doing to preserve biodiversity? Is it a tendency worldwide? 

In this special episode we will dig into three levels: 

- Marta Messa, director of Slow Food Europe, will tell us how the movement is participating to the debate on biodiversity on an institutional level;

- Stefan Leiner, head of the biodiversity unit at the DG for environment at the EU commission, will explain the new legislations regarding biodiversity; 

- Amadé Billesberger, organic farmer at Billesberger Hof  in Bayern Germany, will tell us what biodiversity means on a farm level. 

 

Podcast host: Valentina Gritti

Production & editing: Bra On The Rocks

Music: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes

 

Important: sing the petition to Save Bees and Farmers at this link: https://www.slowfood.com/save-bees-farmers/

 

Slow Food gratefully acknowledges funding support from European Union. The contents of the podcasts are the sole responsibility of Slow Food and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

[EN] Terra Madre Talks: Pia León & Malena Martinez discuss food and culture in the Peruvian highlands.

[EN] Terra Madre Talks: Pia León & Malena Martinez discuss food and culture in the Peruvian highlands.

December 18, 2020

When we think of the mountains, we may make the mistake of simply thinking of them as being “up there”, without considering the layers of diversity they hold at different altitudes, as Pía León and Malena Martínez of Peru explain. 

Peru is a land of extraordinary biodiversity at wildly different altitudes. From 3500 to 4000 meters we find tubers, potatoes, olluco, leaves and roots. Corn proliferates between 2500 and 2800 meters, while cacao grows best at a lower altitude, which is, at the same time, the highest reaches of the jungle. The kitchen can bring this wealth together in a unique experience that, beyond the diversity of foods, represents a diversity of cultures too. 

Pía León is a chef and director, together with her husband Virgilio Martinez, of the restaurants Central and Mil in Lima and of Bar Mayo in Barranco, all focused on Peruvian gastronomic culture. In 2018 Pia was nominated as best woman chef in Latin America for her project Kjolle. She is also the Culinary Director of Mater Iniciativa, the food research workshop of the Central restaurant. Malena Martínez is the Director of Mater Iniciativa. She has spoken about the evolution of the project at #50BestTalks Latin America: United By Food, in Bogota.

Host & dubbing: Valentina Gritti

Music & editing: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes

Gaita: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes; Flute: Clara Gallardo; Percussions: Philip Kukulies.

Find the video of the Food Talk on the Terra Madre website: https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/pia-leon-e-malena-martinez-food-and-culture-at-high-altitude-a-tribute-to-diversity/

Do you like our podcast? You can support us on Patreon and have access to extra materials: http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network.

 

[ES] Terra Madre talks: Pia León y Malena Martinez hablan de comida y cultura en las alturas de Peru.

[ES] Terra Madre talks: Pia León y Malena Martinez hablan de comida y cultura en las alturas de Peru.

December 17, 2020

Cuando pensamos en las montañas, podemos cometer el error de pensar simplemente en ellas como si estuvieran "allá arriba", sin tener en cuenta las capas de diversidad que albergan a diferentes alturas, como explican Pía León y Malena Martínez del Perú. 

El Perú es una tierra de extraordinaria biodiversidad a altitudes muy diferentes. Desde los 3500 a los 4000 metros encontramos tubérculos, papas, ollucos, hojas y raíces. El maíz prolifera entre 2500 y 2800 metros, mientras que el cacao crece mejor a menor altitud, que es, al mismo tiempo, la parte más alta de la selva. La cocina puede reunir esta riqueza en una experiencia única que, más allá de la diversidad de alimentos, representa también una diversidad de culturas. 

Pía León es chef y directora, junto con su esposo, Virgilio Martinez, de los restaurantes Central y Bar Mayo en Lima y de Mil en Cusco, todos enfocados en la cultura gastronómica peruana. En 2018 Pía fue nominada como mejor mujer chef de América Latina por su proyecto Kjolle. También es la Directora Culinaria de Mater Iniciativa, el taller de investigación alimentaria del restaurante Central. Malena Martínez es la Directora de Mater Iniciativa. Ella ha hablado sobre la evolución del proyecto en #50BestTalks Latin America: Unidos por la comida, en Bogotá. 

Podcast host: Valentina Gritti

Música y editing: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes

Gaita colombiana: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes; flauta: Clara Gallardo; percusión: Philip Kukulies.

Enlace video original del Food Talk: https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/pia-leon-e-malena-martinez-food-and-culture-at-high-altitude-a-tribute-to-diversity/

¡Visita el sitio de Terra Madre!

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Un proyecto de Slow Food Youth Network.  

Terra Madre ecosystems: highlands and coffee

Terra Madre ecosystems: highlands and coffee

December 8, 2020

In the episodes of the previous month we decided to learn more about the forest ecosystem and in particular forest people and land rights. This month instead we want to take you to the highlands. But instead of taking it very broad, we have decided to focus on one specialty that grows in the highlands… I am talking about coffee! Yes, the episode of today is entirely dedicated to coffee. 

And we also have a very special host for this episode, who has carried out all the interviews and basically worked on the whole concept I am talking about Kumud Dadlani. Kumud is a child of Asia. She was born in Taipei, raised in Kuala Lumpur and currently she is settled in Bombay. In these countries food is a form of social interaction and this planted in her the seed for the interest in local food systems and in the culture that surrounds it. 

Today Kumud is going to take you to a coffee journey in India, Rwanda, Mexico and Italy. You are going to dig into topics such as coffee agroforestry, specialty coffee and coffee tasting and also the brand-new project of the Coffee alliance of Slow Food. 

So get yourself a warm cup of coffee and enjoy this episode!

Interviewees:

  • Stephany Escamilla Femat & Gerardo Hernández Martínez run the cooperative El Cafecol in Veracruz, Mexico. Together they maintain the objectives of preserving the diversity of the forest, ensure stable livelihoods, develop programs to enhance the value of Coffee and work together with the government to change local policies around Coffee.
  • Arshiya Bose, a social scientist from India who started Black Baza Coffee as a medium to help Coffee farmers to grow the plant in tandem with nature. She speaks about the biodiversity seen in India and the new definition of speciality Coffee. For her, the forest is represented in the cup.
  • Arthur Karuletwa, hails from Rwanda. At his former job at Starbucks Coffee company where he was the Coffee Traceability Director, Arthur has worked on a program using block chain technology to give back and solidify the identities of Coffee growers. He further explains how the terroir can affect the flavour and sensory quality in a cup of Coffee.
  • Emanuele Dughera, works for the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity as coordinator & as a spokesperson of the Africa and Middle East Office. Furthermore, he manages Slow Food actions, grassroots projects, food and educational activities, in the Southern African countries as well as Portuguese speaking countries in Africa. He speaks of a new project called Slow Food Coffee Coalition.

Project manager & host: Valentina Gritti
Special host: Kumud Dadlani
Composition, production & editing: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes
Musicians: 
Percussions: Philip Kukulies;
Mexican music: Tres Ríos: Pablo Rodríguez, Manu Pinzón, Patricia Mancheño, Leonardo Prieto:
African music: Kabele bah, Paul Valdivia, Guillermo siliceo, Jorge whaley y Juan Domingo Rogel; maestro Gwagoro Keita;
Indian music: Codarts Makam and Tala lessons.

This episode is realized in the occasion of the Slow Food event Terra Madre 2020: find the whole program on www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com 
 
Did you like this episode? Support our work and have access to extra material by becoming one of our patrons on http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/
 

Financed by the European Union.
The contents of this podcast are the sole responsibility of the author and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network

Terra Madre talks: Stefano Liberti explains Land Grabbing

Terra Madre talks: Stefano Liberti explains Land Grabbing

November 19, 2020

In the podcast episode dedicated to forest peoples and land rights, I promised you another episode about land grabbing and there it is! Today we have the pleasure of listening to the Italian journalist and writer Stefano Liberti. Among others, he is author of the book I Signori del cibo, by which the movie Soyalism is inspired, and Land Grabbing. Today he is going to talk about the research he carried out for the latter book, including some latest updates and positive examples of peoples that managed to fight against land grabbing and they managed to see their land rights recognized. 

But let’s start from the very beginning: what is land grabbing? 

 

Find out more about Terra Madre: www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com
Interested in the topic? Join the free Terra Madre Forum "Forest peoples' food systems and the threat of land grabbing" on the 21st November. Register at: https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/forest-peoples-food-systems-and-the-threat-of-land-grabbing/ 

Become a SFYN Patron and get access to extra material: http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/

 

Project manager and podcast host: Valentina Gritti
Composition, production and editing: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes
African Ensemble Berekete: Kabele bah, Paul Valdivia, Guillermo siliceo, Jorge whaley and Juan Domingo Rogel; maestro Gwagoro Keita.

Financed by the European Union.
The contents of this podcast are the sole responsibility of the author and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network

 

Focus EU: the new CAP and the Farm to Fork strategy

Focus EU: the new CAP and the Farm to Fork strategy

November 16, 2020

What is going on at the EU policy level? Why is the environmental movement asking for a the withdrawal of the proposal of the new Common Agricultural Policy? What is the Farm to Fork strategy and how binding is it? 
All this questions and much more are answered in this episode by Inés Jordana, coordinator of the EU Food Policy Coalition, and Madeleine Coste, EU Food Policy officer at Slow Food International, in Brussels. 

Podcast host: Valentina Gritti

Production, editing & music: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes

 

Useful links:

EU Food Policy Coalition website; Agriculture Atlas; Slow Food EU website; Good Food Good Farming campaign website.

Important: sing the petition to Save Bees and Farmers at this link: https://www.slowfood.com/save-bees-farmers/

 

Online appointments not to miss: 

- November 17th: Food and Cultural Heritage Conference 11.00-13.00 CET
https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/food-and-cultural-heritage-an-eu-policy-perspective/

- November 24th: the Common Agricultural Policy: keeping ambition high in Europe
https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/the-common-agricultural-poliy-keeping-the-ambition-high-in-europe/ 

 

Financed by the European Union.
The contents of this podcast are the sole responsibility of the author and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network

 

 

Terra Madre ecosystems: Forest people and land grabbing

Terra Madre ecosystems: Forest people and land grabbing

November 3, 2020

The indigenous population doesn’t destroy, we’re only looking for conservation, the preservation of the environment. Indigenous people are the biggest protectors of the Earth. That’s us, the indigenous people are the greatest defenders of nature, of animals, of biodiversity, of the waters… All of that is thanks to the indigenous people _ Murilo Juruna

Today, the SFYN Podcast dedicated to Terra Madre 2020 kicks off its ecosystem exploration journey with an episode dedicated to forests and in particular to forest peoples and land rights. The urgency of creating this particular episode is due to the following target set by the Convention on Biological Diversity in the ‘zero-draft’ Global Biodiversity Framework: By 2030, protect and conserve through a well connected and effective system of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures at least 30% of the planet with the focus on areas particularly important for biodiversity”, so they are suggesting that we increase from 17% (as it is today) to 30% the surface of our planet that will be preserved as a natural reserve.

What you and I may not realize at first glance is that creating natural reserves often means removing the indigenous peoples that are currently living on those lands, who are then forced to move to “somewhere else” which is often not specified by the local authorities.

Interviewees:
- Michele Fontefrancesco, assistant professor in Anthropology at UNISG;
- Dauro Zocchi PhD researcher at UNISG;
- Winnie Kadoshy Sengwer, indigenous Sengwer women from the Embobout forest, Kenya;
- Imanul Huda, indigenous leader in the forest area of Kapuas Hulu, in Indonesia;
- Murilo Juruna, spokesman for the indigenous Slow Food Juruna community of the Cassava in the Brazilian Amazon (
Valorização da Mandioca do Povo Juruna km 30).

Find out more about Terra Madre: www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com
Interested in the topic? Join the free Terra Madre Forum "Forest peoples' food systems and the threat of land grabbing" on the 21st November. Register at: https://terramadresalonedelgusto.com/en/event/forest-peoples-food-systems-and-the-threat-of-land-grabbing/ 

Become a SFYN Patron and get access to extra material: http://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/

 

Project manager and podcast host: Valentina Gritti
Composition, production and editing: Leonardo Prieto Dorantes
Brazilian Percussion: Philip Kukulies
Goni: Agustín Fernández 
African Ensemble: Kabele bah, Paul Valdivia, Guillermo siliceo, Jorge whaley y Juan Domingo Rogel; maestro Gwagoro Keita.
Sound database: Acoustic Ecology Lab @ASU

Financed by the European Union.
The contents of this podcast are the sole responsibility of the author and the EASME is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

A project by the Slow Food Youth Network

[EN] Voices from the roots: Yolotzin Bravo and Zarasisa Wakamaya

[EN] Voices from the roots: Yolotzin Bravo and Zarasisa Wakamaya

November 1, 2020

In 'Voices from the Roots', Indigenous storytellers will take you to Kenya, Zambia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Kyrgyzstan, Uganda and many other countries, to meet their communities, to visit their houses, to listen to their dreams and personal achievements. 

Today we are going to finish the series dedicated to indigenous youth stories by listening to the tales of Yolotzin Bravo, in Chiapas, Mexico, and Zarasisa Wacamaya in Cañar, Ecuador. From Tuesday onwards we are going to start the podcast series dedicated to Terra Madre: the biggest event that the Slow Food movement organizes every two years, involving food, communities and activists from all over the world. This edition, due to the global pandemic, will have a big digital part and you can find the whole program on www.terramadresalonedelgusto.com

Remember to subscribe to our channel and support our work through the Patreon platform: https://patreon.com/join/slowfoodyouthnetwork/ 

A special thanks to Ana Silvia García Castellanos and Arianna Labasin for translation and dubbing of this episode and to Leonardo Prieto Dorantes for the music of the whole Voices from the roots series.

Get ready for the Terra Madre series!

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